What’s Around The Suites

MySuites: What makes Soho unique for you? Zebedee: Surrounded by Tribeca and the West Village, all its designer shops, salons and fine dining, theres no wonder most consider Soho to be quite a 'chic' neck of the woods. But I’m happy to say there is much more to be found than the Ritz. You have a lot of famous artists and musicians in the neighborhood often playing small hidden sets. The architecture is to die for but you'd have to be pretty wealthy to own some of these luxury apartments. That being said some of them are rent controlled and have been owned for decades, so there is no removing the rich history this place still has running deep below the cobble stone. There is a huge hospitality scene, where we are always visiting and sending business to one another. If you did a good night in tips, you'll be sure to pass it around at your mates bar, or vice versa, if you didn't do so well, then not to worry, as the buy back system is still very much alive in soho. MySuites: Secret spot? Zebedee: I’m always checking out new spots in the neighborhood, but there is one place I'll always stop by for a nightcap. That place is, Toad Hall. Found on Grand and West Broadway, next to Lucky Strike (best burgers, FYI). This bar truly reminds me of Cheers, I feel like Ted Danson is about to walk in at any time. I'm fairly certain that there aren't too many bars like this anymore. Its always a fight to get onto the pool table, then you'll have to fight to stay on. Now that I mention it, I've literally seen fights around that table, but once your in that circle there's no leaving. Great classic tunes and 4am conversations with the owner or barkeep. You may even be treated to surprise plates of home made cherry pie and lemon mourang from local bakers/whiskey enthusiasts. Hands down, my favorite dive bar in NYC MySuites: When did you start acting? Zebedee: I started acting when I was a kid, doing little plays and workshops here and there. But it wasn't until I was about 16 that I realized I had a talent that not only was fulfilling but really worth pursuing. That lead me to the Stella Adler Studio of Acting in 2008 where I graduated in 2011. And now I'm working on a new show with Martin Scorsese and HBO called Vinyl, that comes out on Valentines Day, so look out for that. MySuites: What made you fall for NYC? Zebedee: Probably, all its opportunity, "the seasons" and it's rich amount of culture and history. I come from Melbourne, Australia, and it certainly offers all four seasons, as well as opportunities, but nothing compared to the extremes of New York, which I love. I'm also fascinated by people. We've all heard "New York is a melting pot" but I don't think that accurately describes the different walks of life that occupy the New York City streets. So day to day life makes for very interesting study. MySuites: Tell me about you band? Zebedee: I’m working on a couple of projects at the moment. The Harmonica Lewinskies and I have been playing together for about 6 years (some feet for an 8 piece band). We are more of a Funky Big Band, playing classic soul, blues and rock n roll. We've been in the studio these past months, working on a new album titled 'Bring Back Bush' (fairly relevant if ask me) thats due early next year. I've also just completed another album, also recorded at a studio called Mama Coco's Funky Kitchen, with some friends from Mexico. Not sure what to call it yet, but we're toying with the name Babár, named after the French cartoon of an aristocratic elephant. MySuites: Some secret about your journey in NYC? Zebedee: I’ve certainly gone through many ups and downs over the years and would never be where I am today if it wasn't for the kindness and support of friends, family and sometimes strangers. But if you never forget the dreams that you brought with you to New York, you'll continue to inspire those around you, and everything should fall into its right place. That's the trick...

MySuites: What made you fall for NYC? Nikki: New York is intoxicating, there is no place in the world quite like it. There is a constant buzz in the air, always something to discover. The opportunities here are endless. MySuites: What makes Gramercy unique for you? Nikki: The homes around Gramercy Park are stunning, I love strolling along the streets lined with Victorian homes. It reminds me of Savannah, GA, where I went to school and makes me nostalgic for those warm summer evenings. MySuites: Is there a particular place in the neighborhood you find yourself going to constantly? Nikki: Gramercy has so many wonderful establishments. The Lobby Bar at the Ace Hotel has a great selection of craft beers. I love wandering through ABC Home, and dreaming of decorating my apartment. MySuites: When did you begin taking photos? Nikki: I began taking photos in high school of my grandmother Jane. Ever since then I loved being able to create a narrative and a fantasy through fashion photography MySuites: You used to work at Harper’s Bazaar. Tell me about that. Nikki: Harper’s Bazaar was an amazing experience. I was able to view the initial concepts and see the printed issues months later. It was very gratifying. I loved working along other creatives in such a fast paced environment. There were always prints to deliver and assignments to confirm. I believe that it’s good to work really hard at some point in your life. Some people can do that forever and some can do it in intervals. Either way, it’s something we all need at one point. MySuites: Did working for such an acclaimed publication inspire you with your own work in any way? Nikki: Working at Harper’s Bazaar inspired me to push myself and shoot as often as possible. This industry is so high speed with the garments and imagery that is produced. In order to stay relevant you have to be up to speed with every ebb and flow of the industry. MySuites: Tell me about your photography now: Nikki: My photography now plays with unconventional aspects. To this day I love photographing my grandmother and using her in fashion editorials. I am trying to stay away from the ultra-glamorized world of fashion photography and making images that people and especially women can relate to. MySuites: Any advice for young artists looking to break into the industry here? Nikki: If you have passion for a creative career, you should pursue it. In our life our work consumes most of our time and if you’re miserable with your job then your quality of life is going to go down. Being an artist is a tough path but in my opinion the most rewarding. Every morning I get out of bed and look forward to the new work that I am creating. It is what keeps me going in this bustling city. For more on Nikki, visit nikkikrecicki.com ...

MySuites: What made you fall for NYC? Meyrem: Its energy. It’s something else, you know? This place just makes me feel ridiculously alive and like anything is possible. MySuites: What makes Meatpacking District unique for you? Meyrem: I’m quite sentimental about it! It’s the first neighborhood I have worked in and the architecture reminds me of home. MySuites: Is there a particular place in the neighborhood you find yourself going to constantly? Meyrem: The three essentials: Chelsea Market for food, Blue Bottle for coffee, Milk Studios for photos. MySuites: When did you begin taking photos? Meyrem: When I was seventeen. MySuites: You used to work with Annie Leibovitz, can you ell me about that? Meyrem: It was an amazing experience. I have loved Annie’s work for as long as I’ve been photographing. I remember being seventeen and driving everyone crazy with my “one day I’ll work for Annie” talk that lasted a whole month! Can you believe that? I will always be grateful for that opportunity. Her team is very tight and I felt proud that I was able to be a part of it for a short while. MySuites: Did working for such an acclaimed photographer inspire you with your own work in any way? Meyrem: Yes, of course. Annie was inspiring to me on many levels. Just being in the same room as her was a reminder of everything I wish for myself as a photographer. I felt like I was on fire, a million times more driven. MySuites: can you tell us a bit about your photography? Meyrem: It’s a good mix of personal work and commercial. In terms of aesthetic, it’s always changing, but this time it feels like I’m about to have another breakthrough. MySuites: Any advice for young artists looking to break into the industry here? Meyrem: Here’s a cheat sheet I wish I had when I first started! Collaborate as much as you can and make connections wherever you go. Work, work, work. Don’t take no for an answer. Be honest, confident, kind and create out of pure passion. When things get out of hand on set, be the person who keeps it together, it matters! The industry is too tiny for gossips. I could go on forever, but overall I think it’s important to be a good human and have faith in your work. And when you struggle, just remember you’re a gladiator and that great work eventually gets noticed. I hope that helps! For more about Meyrem, visit her at meyrembulucek.com....

Jane Hotel With its élite air, The Jane is notorious in The West Village. The grandiose space has an old-world, too-chic-for-modern-society quality, and the design only adds to the bravura. It’s covered in antique rugs, wing, tufted chairs, velvet curtains, and a marvelous fireplace. Fall into the atmosphere with the live music, constant dancing, specialty cocktails—like The Punjab—and imported beers. If you’re feeling bold, grab a stranger to dance with. They’re probably feeling as elated and buzzing as you are. After all, Carpe diem. thejanenyc.com - 113 Jane St Waverly Inn Another one of John DeLucie’s inventions, Waverly Inn is the archetype of the West Village’s aesthetic. Its bohemian space will have you feeling as if you are only a table away from the Beat writers Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. The menu is posh yet raffish, a mirror of the neighborhood. We like Amish Chicken (potato terrine, bitter greens, balsamic-glazed cipollini and a mustard jus) on regular days, and Grilled Octopus (peanut potatoes, green goddess and lemon) on days when we are feeling exceedingly more adventurous. Whatever day it is for you, make sure to order a side of the French Fries or Grilled Asparagus. And don’t forget to bring your copy of On the Road to read while you wait for your food. waverlynyc.com - 16 Bank St Saturdays Coffee connoisseurs and lovers of West Coast-inspired apparel can rejoice, because Saturdays encompasses both. And if you thought the medley couldn't get any better, the interior design proves otherwise. Lined with large windows with built-in wood benches and wood shelves with piping for support, it's industrial meets classic. While you admire the space, don't forget to order a latte to accompany you as you browse the clothing or simply as you sit and read. Also, don't forget to snag one of their signature Saturdays shirts before leaving. saturdaysnyc.com - 31 Crosby St Robin Rice Gallery robinricegallery.com - 325 W 11th St Spotted Pig This is New York City's first gastropub (opened in 2004) and it is still a celebrated spot among both locals and travelers. Don't let the neon magenta exterior fool you. Once you step inside, you'll find an airy space with exposed brick and rows and rows of tables topped with white tablecloths. The atmosphere is fun and adventurous, and you'll feel likewise so order accordingly. For all of your carnivore needs, try: Pork Rillete with Mustard, Pickles & Toast; Crispy Pig's Ear Salad with Lemon Caper Dressing; Skirt Steak with Creamed Kale & Sauteed Wild Mushrooms. For a more Americana meal with a French twist, order the Chargrilled Burger with Roquefort Cheese & Shoestring Fries. You'll walk out with vigor in your step, we're certain of it. thespottedpig.com - 314 W 11th St Monocle In need of some unique items to jazz up your space? Monocle has got you. This contemporary publication and store know design. Right now we can’t help but rave about their collaborative snug double-cloth throw with Eleanor Pritchard. It’s available in grey or blue, with white-checked backs. How versatile is that? But if warmth is not what you’re looking for, we also love their brass bookends from their Brass Collection. Minimal and well-made. What more could you want? monocle.com - 535 Hudson St Urban Zen Known for their sleek designs, Urban Zen is the calm before a beautiful storm. Their pieces will undoubtedly liven up any space, creating an uproar in the mundane. We love their White Raku Vase with Black Graphic, and feel that it goes well in any room—bathroom, kitchen, hallway, living room, dining room, or bedroom. Now, allow this to zen create a splash. urbanzen.com - 705 Greenwich St L’ Artusi For a modern perspective on Italian cuisine, dine at L'Artrusi, named after the 19th century Italian businessman and writer, Pellegrino Artusi. It is notorious for being the best Italian downtown, and we have to agree. With its marble countertops and charcoal walls, it is both sophisticated and moody, and its dishes are just that, too. For a pasta, order the Ravioli (butternut squash, brown butter, sage, parmesan). If you want something with a bit more provision, we love everything under Carne, but our personal favorite is the Roasted Chicken (hen of the woods, scallion). It is such a simple plate, yet you will find yourself dreaming about its sapor for the weeks to follow. lartusi.com - 228 W 10th St Double RL For a true American shopping experience, Double RL is a must. Their West Village location is nestled in a cozy block on Bleecker Street, giving a nostalgic aura to everyone who grew up with the brand. The space reminiscent of some cottage nestled on Connecticut's coast with its plaid blankets draped over leather reading chairs and sturdy wood floors. If you long for something cozy and sophisticated, Double RL is idyllic for you. ralphlauren.com - 381 Bleecker St Goorin Bros If you love sturdy, chic wide-brim hats, you'll love Goorin Bros. The shop began in Pittsburgh in 1895 with Cassel Goorin on a horse-drawn cart that was spilling over with hats he lovingly crafted. Sans the horse-drawn cart, not much has changed. Rich in history, the space is a nod to late 1800's interior design and the employees dress accordingly to the era, too. Stop by Goorin Bros. before a day at Central Park, or any day, for that matter. goorin.com - 337 Bleecker St Employees Want to feel as if you’re on the inside of a club? Then Employees Only is your dwelling place (or, club). Alcohol aficionados can rejoice, because it’s mixology at its best here, truly. We love their West Side (Charbay Meyer Lemon Vodka & Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice Shaken with Fresh Mint). Also, it’s a speakeasy. If these factors don’t already make it sound alluring enough, everything is dark, moody and very, very vintage feeling. It’s like you’ve been transferred to a secret party during Prohibition. And it has the thrilling atmosphere to match. To be elite or not to be elite. It’s definitely the question, but with Employees Only, we’re choosing the former. employeesonlynyc.com - 510 Hudson St Buvette Located on cozy Grove Street, Buvette is the ultimate breakfast and brunch spot with French roots. Their rich wood and exposed brick interior will make you feel as if you are at their café in Paris, especially with one of their ambrosial espressos in hand. To top off that espresso, try one of our favorite savory plates of theirs: CR Q Monsieur (a classic ham and gruyere on toast). Or, if you're in the mood for something with more protein to help you begin your day, Poached Eggas (poached egg over lentils and kale) is the perfect medley of rich greens, legumes, and a runny egg to keep you going. We also love Frits à l’ amèricaine (sunny side egg with bacon and sage). The sage adds an innovative take to this very classic breakfast dish and we absolutely love it! buvette.com - 42 Grove St IFC Centers With a film school under their belt, IFC Centers doesn’t mess around. They are considered “the ultimate entertainment space for New Yorkers seeking out the best in independent films,” and we can’t help but agree. And with organic popcorn at the concession stand, vintage movie posters in the hallway, and short film screenings before every feature, who can resist? They also host a documentary festival every November. ifccenter.com - 323 Ave of the Americas Adelaide Although located in a garage and trucking warehouse, Adelaide is anything but shabby. This West Village spot is loved by its neighborhood for its modern, sophisticated use of space. We love their plethora of vintage goods. Our current favorite is their 1950’s Arno Jacobsen Chair for Knoll. Place that piece of vintage in any living space and it’s automatically transformed. adelaideny.com - 702 Greenwich St Algus Greenspon Angus Greenspon more than just a gallery. It’s an experience. The space is vast and minimal, allowing the focus to be on the works. From Gene Beery to Adriana Lara, Algus Greenspan understands the vitality of diversity. And he’s been doing this for over twenty years, so his knowledge of the art realm—especially in NYC—is expansive. algusgreenspon.com - 71 Morton St Maccarone This contemporary art gallery’s doors were first opened in 2001 after Michele Maccarone renovated an abandoned electric store on Canal Street. Since then it has taken off, allowing a location in Los Angeles, too. And its accolade of artists is impressive, ranging from Oscar Tuazon to Daniel Roth. We love their exhibition of Keith Sonnier’s work for Portals and can’t wait to see what they curate next. maccarone.net - 630 Greenwich St Little Branch With homage to "the old rules," Little Branch is an experience in of itself. The space is warm and snug, with mustard-painted walls and an orange ceiling made with corrugated steel. The stuff is both friendly and determined, smiling at costumers while briskly mixing drinks. The cocktails are mainly old-fashioned, such as their Queens Park Swizzle (Trinidadian version of a mojito). And don't forget to ask your bartender for some recommendations based on the liquor you favor, because Little Branch has a book chalk full of them. 20 7th Ave S Ovando The neighborhood's most acclaimed floral design and event production firm rests humbly on Christopher Street. Its efflorescent creator, Sandra, uses her Spanish and Russian heritage to develop her passion for the brightly exotic. Each piece is artful, which is why she's done floral designs for The MoMA and Hermès. Her Fall Collection, focusing on both blooms and foliage, is sleek and warming. One of Sandra's favorites, Fall Textural, is one of ours, too. ovandony.com - 19 E 65th St ...

Akira Ikeda Gallery With gallery spaces from Tokyo to Berlin, their New York City location is just the tip of the iceberg. Nevertheless, each space is golden and is articulately curated to its surroundings. Their exhibition of Robert Smithson’s Early Work, which are comprised of oil paintings on canvas, will leave you in awe. So while you’re exploring West Village, don’t forget to take a break physically to experience these masterpieces mentally. akiraikedagallery.com - 17 Cornelia St Algus Greenspon Angus Greenspon more than just a gallery. It’s an experience. The space is vast and minimal, allowing the focus to be on the works. From Gene Beery to Adriana Lara, Algus Greenspan understands the vitality of diversity. And he’s been doing this for over twenty years, so his knowledge of the art realm—especially in NYC—is expansive. algusgreenspon.com - 71 Morton St Maccarone This contemporary art gallery’s doors were first opened in 2001 after Michele Maccarone renovated an abandoned electric store on Canal Street. Since then it has taken off, allowing a location in Los Angeles, too. And its accolade of artists is impressive, ranging from Oscar Tuazon to Daniel Roth. We love their exhibition of Keith Sonnier’s work for Portals and can’t wait to see what they curate next. maccarone.net - 630 Greenwich St IFC Centers With a film school under their belt, IFC Centers doesn’t mess around. They are considered “the ultimate entertainment space for New Yorkers seeking out the best in independent films,” and we can’t help but agree. And with organic popcorn at the concession stand, vintage movie posters in the hallway, and short film screenings before every feature, who can resist? They also host a documentary festival every November. ifccenter.com - 323 Ave of the Americas...

Fat Cat If you have an affinity for pool, ping pong, live music, and cheap (but so good) beers, Fat Cat is your dream in the form of a bar. It’s the perfect hang out spot after a day of exploring or working (or maybe a little bit of both). With its neon lights, low ceilings, and tiled floors, you’ll feel as if you’re in some ‘90s flick (Tom Hanks or Ryan Phillippe, you take your pick). The jazz music provides a nice offset. The lineup is always exceptional, with performances by The George Braith Quartet and Saul Rubin. Before the performance, grab a $2.00 beer and don’t what you’ll say when the modern day Tom Hanks says to you, “Don't you love New York in the fall?” 75 Christopher St The Jane With its élite air, The Jane is notorious in The West Village. The grandiose space has an old-world, too-chic-for-modern-society quality, and the design only adds to the bravura. It’s covered in antique rugs, wing, tufted chairs, velvet curtains, and a marvelous fireplace. Fall into the atmosphere with the live music, constant dancing, specialty cocktails—like The Punjab—and imported beers. If you’re feeling bold, grab a stranger to dance with. They’re probably feeling as elated and buzzing as you are. After all, Carpe diem. 113 Jane St Employees Only Want to feel as if you’re on the inside of a club? Then Employees Only is your dwelling place (or, club). Alcohol aficionados can rejoice, because it’s mixology at its best here, truly. We love their West Side (Charbay Meyer Lemon Vodka & Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice Shaken with Fresh Mint). Also, it’s a speakeasy. If these factors don’t already make it sound alluring enough, everything is dark, moody and very, very vintage feeling. It’s like you’ve been transferred to a secret party during Prohibition. And it has the thrilling atmosphere to match. To be elite or not to be elite. It’s definitely the question, but with Employees Only, we’re choosing the former. 510 Hudson St...

Fedora For an intimate evening out, get drinks at the French-American style bar, Fedora. Its moodily chic atmosphere will allow you to uncoil the day's responsibilities as you settle into one of their tufted black leather booths. And we can't forget their à la mode cocktails. For weeknights, order something under First Dance. We love The Giddyup (Aperol, Amaro, Montenegro, Lemon, Apricot). For weekends, go for something under Shake That Body--Theatrical Teaser Trailer (Tequila, Vida Mezcal, Brovo Doug Fir, Lime, Pineapple)--or Darkness on the Edge of Town--Joyce Carol Oates Writes Good (Bourbon, Amaro, Spice). You'll dance home with a little bit of edge in each step. 239 W 4th St The Garret Latent above the notorious burger joint Five Guys is the speakeasy West Villagers can't stop talking about (in hushed voices, of course). And with good reason. The space is somber and sleek. adorned with two colossal skylights, tufted leather couches, and wooden stools and benches. Oh, and we can't forget the taxidermy rhino head. As for drinks, order the Rosarita Stick Up (rosemary, thyme syrup, egg white, lemon juice, and Grand Meriner topped with rose petals). The beautiful concoction was created exclusively by one of the bartender's. 2nd floor, 296 Bleecker St Little Branch With homage to "the old rules," Little Branch is an experience in of itself. The space is warm and snug, with mustard-painted walls and an orange ceiling made with corrugated steel. The stuff is both friendly and determined, smiling at costumers while briskly mixing drinks. The cocktails are mainly old-fashioned, such as their Queens Park Swizzle (Trinidadian version of a mojito). And don't forget to ask your bartender for some recommendations based on the liquor you favor, because Little Branch has a book chalk full of them. 20 7th Ave S Wilfie & Nell With its exposed brick, tattered wooden bar, and tufted black leather seating, Wilfie & Nell is mysterious yet cozy. And its drinks are so, too. We love their unconventional take on a margarita with their Spicy Margarita (Tequila, Habanero Agave, Lime, Grapefruit Juice). It will undoubtedly add a kick to your night. Now, for something light and refreshing, order the Aperol Spritz (Aperol, Prosecco, Soda). Whichever way you prefer your drink, it's only the best here. 228 W 4th St Cornelia Street Cafe While quiet at first, Cornelia Street Cafe livens up once the jazz begins. And when it does, you'll be transported to some street corner in the lustrous 1930’s. "A culinary as well as a cultural landmark" indeed, their cocktails are something to be had. Try their Cornelia Red Sangria (Red Wine, Apricot Brandy, Fresh Fruit) and share one of their appetizers with a friend, like the Three Artisanal Cheese Plate (Mission Fig, Apricot Chutney, Crouton Toasts, and Spiced Nuts). Sip and munch as the saxophone player flies—metaphorically speaking, of course—you from New York to New Orleans. 29 Cornelia St...

Urban Zen Known for their sleek designs, Urban Zen is the calm before a beautiful storm. Their pieces will undoubtedly liven up any space, creating an uproar in the mundane. We love their White Raku Vase with Black Graphic, and feel that it goes well in any room—bathroom, kitchen, hallway, living room, dining room, or bedroom. Now, allow this to zen create a splash. urbanzen.com - 705 Greenwich St Adelaide Although located in a garage and trucking warehouse, Adelaide is anything but shabby. This West Village spot is loved by its neighborhood for its modern, sophisticated use of space. We love their plethora of vintage goods. Our current favorite is their 1950’s Arno Jacobsen Chair for Knoll. Place that piece of vintage in any living space and it’s automatically transformed. adelaideny.com - 702 Greenwich St Heiberg Cummings Design Helberg Cummings Design allows you to bring that upstate New York feel back into an NYC space. We love how this design firm has a showroom in the West Village! It’s full of beautiful textiles, gorgeous, oaky furniture, and candles. We love how one of their ginger fragrance candles can jazz up any room. Sometimes, it’s the little things in life! hcd3.com - 655 Washington St Monocle In need of some unique items to jazz up your space? Monocle has got you. This contemporary publication and store know design. Right now we can’t help but rave about their collaborative snug double-cloth throw with Eleanor Pritchard. It’s available in grey or blue, with white-checked backs. How verstile is that? But if warmth is not what you’re looking for, we also love their brass bookends from their Brass Collection. Minimal and well-made. What more could you want? monocle.com - 535 Hudson St...

Whether you've lived in the city all of your life and are in need of a staycation, or you are experiencing it for the first time, there is this never-ending excitement in discovering a new restaurant or café. Our Christopher Suites, located in the bohemian-esque West Village, are surrounded by superb places to eat and drink. That being said, here is a list of our favorites, and we hope that they become some of your favorites, too. Breakfast and Brunch Time Buvette Located on cozy Grove Street, Buvette is the ultimate breakfast and brunch spot with French roots. Their rich wood and exposed brick interior will make you feel as if you are at their café in Paris, especially with one of their ambrosial espressos in hand. To top off that espresso, try one of our favorite savory plates of theirs: CR Q Monsieur (a classic ham and gruyere on toast). Or, if you're in the mood for something with more protein to help you begin your day, Poached Eggas (poached egg over lentils and kale) is the perfect medley of rich greens, legumes, and a runny egg to keep you going. We also love Frits à l’ amèricaine (sunny side egg with bacon and sage). The sage adds an innovative take to this very classic breakfast dish and we absolutely love it! 42 Grove St THE ELK THE ELK not only fulfills all of your minimalistic design dreams, but it serves the kind of envy-worthy dishes you've seen on social media a thousand times before. But first, their dreamy coffee. You won't be able to help but get some since their walls are lined with wooden shelves holding bags upon bags of coffee, spilling the aromas into the space. Start your order with a macchiato and thank us later. After that, try their Avocado Toast. Its roasted pepitas make it different than any smashed avocado you've had before in the best way possible. For something a bit lighter, get their Granola. Or, for something sweet with a healthy twist, order Grapefruit Brulée. Don't forget to take a picture (or a hundred) for your social media platforms, too. 28 Charles St The Little Owl With its vibrant exterior and intimate interior, The Little Owl is the perfect balance of excitement and warmth. And its savory plates are just that. After a late evening out on the city, go here for brunch and leave feeling revived. Each dish will satisfy any late night craving from the night prior. We love Crispy Cornish Hen (Brussels sprouts home fries, sherry, and dijon), Bibb & Beets (squash, spicy pepitas, and parmesan), or Chilaquiles (with avocado). Also, don't forget to split some beignettes with nutella and raspberry while you wait for your main dishes. 90 Bedford St Lunch Time The Spotted Pig This is New York City's first gastropub (opened in 2004) and it is still a celebrated spot among both locals and travelers. Don't let the neon magenta exterior fool you. Once you step inside, you'll find an airy space with exposed brick and rows and rows of tables topped with white tablecloths. The atmosphere is fun and adventurous, and you'll feel likewise so order accordingly. For all of your carnivore needs, try: Pork Rillete with Mustard, Pickles & Toast; Crispy Pig's Ear Salad with Lemon Caper Dressing; Skirt Steak with Creamed Kale & Sauteed Wild Mushrooms. For a more Americana meal with a French twist, order the Chargrilled Burger with Roquefort Cheese & Shoestring Fries. You'll walk out with vigor in your step, we're certain of it. 314 West 11th St Red Farm Do you ever get the desire to go to a farm but don’t want to make the trek out of the city? Us too. Which is why we love Red Farm, a rambunctious Chinese fusion restaurant located two blocks from the Hudson River. It's a renovated townhouse with rafters and banquettes. What we love most, though, is its barnyard accents, such as wooden crates and a mural of docks. You will feel as if you are in some rural town upstate rather than the West Village. The menu is eclectic, with dishes varying from Spicy Crispy Beef—which will get you out of that afternoon lull, Shrimp Stuffed Jalapeno, Pan Fried Pork Buns, Dumplings, and Wide Rice Noodles BBQ'd Roasted Duck. Come with an empty stomach and leave feeling satisfied until dinner! 529 Hudson St Rosemary A hidden Italian gem undoubtedly, Rosemary serves up the most enticing Mediterranean dishes in the West Village. Named after the owner Suarez’s mother, the restaurant is inspired by her home in Lucca, Italy as well as the neighborhood. With parquet tabletops that are long and shared with other guests and the rooftop farm, you'll feel as if you are in Suarez's home. For a classic dish, order the Linguine (preserved lemon, pickled chili, parmigiano) or the Cavatelli (Eckerton Hill Farms heirloom tomatoes, basil, parmigiano). For something less traditional, try Rosemary's Burger (beef, prosciutto and guanciale burger, magic spice ketchup, provolone, Rosemary's potatoes) and make sure to pair it with a glass of Brigaldara Valpolicella. 8 Greenwich Ave Dinner Time: The Lion A sanctuary for bon vivants, John DeLucie’s The Lion has everyone dining and writing (reviews). Its interior is something out of some early 20th century lord’s home, with its walls covered in framed art pieces, ranging from photographs to ostentatious oil paintings. The seating is just as mottled; there are pews covered in pillows, forest green leather booths, and mingled wooden chairs, creating a tranquil dining atmosphere. The menu (best for carnivores) is reflective of the space, alternating from Smoked Berkshire Pork Chops (brined & smoked, slow cooked collard greens, bacon), Chicken Pot Pie (seasonal vegetables, béchamel sauce), and Reginetti (lamb merguez, pistachio, ricotta salata). End your time at The Lion with The Peach Semifreddo (blueberry compote, thai basil). If there is one place where sharing is optional, it is here. And thank goodness for that. 62 W 9th St Waverly Inn Another one of John DeLucie’s inventions, Waverly Inn is the archetype of the West Village’s aesthetic. Its bohemian space will have you feeling as if you are only a table away from the Beat writers Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. The menu is posh yet raffish, a mirror of the neighborhood. We like Amish Chicken (potato terrine, bitter greens, balsamic-glazed cipollini and a mustard jus) on regular days, and Grilled Octopus (peanut potatoes, green goddess and lemon) on days when we are feeling exceedingly more adventurous. Whatever day it is for you, make sure to order a side of the French Fries or Grilled Asparagus. And don’t forget to bring your copy of On the Road to read while you wait for your food. 16 Bank St Bar Sardine After an evening of attending a Broadway show in Time Square or an art gallery in Chelsea with friends, make your way to Bar Sardine. Its parquet floors, low wooden stools, and chalkboard wall for a menu make it seem as if you are arriving at a second home. We love its Late Night menu, and you will too when it’s midnight and your stomach begins to growl. For something light—a snack of sorts—order Little Gems (heirloom cherry tomatoes, castelvetrano olives, walnuts, blue cheese). If you’re especially ravenous, get the Fedora Burger (smoked cheddar, crispy potatoes, cucumbers, and BBQ mayo) and Herbed French Fries (maple-mustard aioli). Leave this home away from home and return to yours feeling contented. 183 W 10th St L'Artusi For a modern perspective on Italian cuisine, dine at L'Artrusi, named after the 19th century Italian businessman and writer, Pellegrino Artusi. It is notorious for being the best Italian downtown, and we have to agree. With its marble countertops and charcoal walls, it is both sophisticated and moody, and its dishes are just that, too. For a pasta, order the Ravioli (butternut squash, brown butter, sage, parmesan). If you want something with a bit more provision, we love everything under Carne, but our personal favorite is the Roasted Chicken (hen of the woods, scallion). It is such a simply plate, yet you will find yourself dreaming about its sapor for the weeks to follow. 28 W 10th St Sant Ambroeus Residing in the heart of the village, Sant Ambroeus brings the finest Milanese dishes to New Yorkers and travelers alike. Its Milanese atmosphere and decor only add to the allure, with deep red booths and walls covered in exquisite frames from La Scala, Milan. Chef Andrea Bucciarelli carries the northern city into the dishes, as well. We adore their Caprese (kumato tomato, buffalo mozzarella, fresh basil, extra virgin olive oil). The buffalo mozzarella adds a nice punch to this classic plate. For something more healthy and hearty, try their Quinoa Sant Ambroeus (organic quinoa, cauliflower, salsify, sun-dried tomato, pickled onion, and shaved Brussels sprouts). Also, we can't forget their Risotto Al Parmigiano (36-month aged Parmigiano, Reggiano and "Villa Manodori" balsamic vinegar). When the waiter comes to take your plate, you'll find yourself making sure you got the very last bite. 259 W 4th St...

Rag and Bone Britain and America collide in the most modern, melancholy manner at Rag & Bone. The space rests humbly between Bedford Street and Bleecker Street. While small, each inch is unitized, creating an intimately chic experience. With the exposed brick walls, racks of monochromatic apparel, and subduing music, you'll feel as if you're in a music video for The xx, and who can resist that? rag-bone.com - 104 Christopher St Otte NYC With the signature West Village emerald green paint job, Otte NYC is unsuspecting at first. But once you're inside, you'll feel as if you've been transported into the hippest of fashion design studios. It's apparel meets art. The all white interior makes the space feel expansive--lively. The apparel and accessories are displayed on elongated white tables with a minimalistic approach, allowing you to fully appreciate each piece's aesthetic. After all, it's an experience in of itself. otteny.com - 37 W 26th St Annie Bing Light and airy yet bold is the best way to describe Anine Bing. The space's light wood floors are offset by the dynamic black metal accents, such as a glass case with black trim and black cube divider. With a focus on monochromatic apparel and footwear (think black leather Chelsea boots), you'll feel like Alexa Chung as you browse (and possibly buy) the carefully curated pieces. aninebing.com - 330 Bleecker St Billy Reid Placed on the neighborly Charles Street is the mise en scène of essentials--Billy Reid. The shop's design conveys this mindset, too, with its wood paneling and white built-in bookcases used for displaying the accessories. It's a look that never goes out of style, just like the apparel. From stoutheartedly crafted knitwear to olive green leather backpacks with cordovan straps, each piece is designed for a day around town or a weekend trip to the mountains. It's where chicness and durability meet, because, after all, it's all about versatility here. billyreid.com - 94 Charles St Saturdays Coffee connoisseurs and lovers of West Coast-inspired apparel can rejoice, because Saturdays encompasses both. And if you thought the medley couldn't get any better, the interior design proves otherwise. Lined with large windows with built-in wood benches and wood shelves with piping for support, it's industrial meets classic. While you admire the space, don't forget to order a latte to accompany you as you browse the clothing or simply as you sit and read. Also, don't forget to snag one of their signature Saturdays shirts before leaving. saturdaysnyc.com/west-village - 7 Perry St Castor and Pollux With the belief that our choices can "transform our lives into something richer, fuller and more complete," Castor and Pollux brings that notion into their designs. Everything is aesthetically pleasing, yet there is always something odd--unexpected. And that's the intention, to use duality, just like in Greek mythology, to create unity. And unity brings us to family, which is also a tremendous influence behind the company. Everything is inspired by a family member. We especially love their (Aunt) Maggie Bracelets birthstone collection. Each one is 100% brass and has a story to tell. When your aunt wears something for forty years, you know it's worth investing in. castorandpolluxstore.com - 238 W 10th St Aloha Rag Minimalism is the forefront of Aloha Rag, the Honolulu store full of well-known designers as well as up-and-coming ones. The space is copious, having a renovated warehouse aura with its translucent grey walls and maple wood floors. The store's inventory of both big and small names make it notable without being daunting. Contemporarily stocked, with designers such as Yoshinori Kotake and Ar Srpls. Plus, they hold a lot of sample sales. Need we say more? 505 Greenwich St Ovando The neighborhood's most acclaimed floral design and event production firm rests humbly on Christopher Street. Its efflorescent creator, Sandra, uses her Spanish and Russian heritage to develop her passion for the brightly exotic. Each piece is artful, which is why she's done floral designs for The MoMA and Hermès. Her Fall Collection, focusing on both blooms and foliage, is sleek and warming. One of Sandra's favorites, Fall Textural, is one of ours, too. ovandony.com - 91 Christopher St Maison Margiela Resembling a warehouse-turned-loft, the leading Belgian designer creates an interior masterpiece in an unsuspecting space on the corner of Bleecker Street and Charles Street. The meager whitewashed walls and exposed piping creates the perfect combination of minimalism and dynamism. With a mix of neons and neutrals, the apparel pops against the interior design, making it feel as if you're viewing art pieces rather than clothing. But isn't fashion just an extension of art, anyway? maisonmargiela.com - 363 Bleecker St James Perse Using his Los Angeles upbringing as the muse behind his creations, James Perse introduces luxe to practical. And it works. His love for the casually sleek also influences the interior design, making a space that is minimalistic yet punchy. The moodily vibrant atmosphere will make you feel like you're on the West Coast, so why not invest in one of his original designs, loved by LA filmmakers and musicians alike, the Trucker Hat. The Double Face Knit Trucker Hat in black is our personal favorite. jamesperse.com - 368 Bleecker St Double RL For a true American shopping experience, Double RL is a must. Their West Village location is nestled in a cozy block on Bleecker Street, giving a nostalgic aura to everyone who grew up with the brand. The space reminiscent of some cottage nestled on Connecticut's coast with its plaid blankets draped over leather reading chairs and sturdy wood floors. If you long for something cozy and sophisticated, Double RL is idyllic for you. ralphlauren.com - 81 Bleecker St Goorin Bros If you love sturdy, chic wide-brim hats, you'll love Goorin Bros.. The shop began in Pittsburgh in 1895 with Cassel Goorin on a horse-drawn cart that was spilling over with hats he lovingly crafted. Sans the horse-drawn cart, not much has changed. Rich in history, the space is a nod to late 1800's interior design and the employees dress accordingly to the era, too. Stop by Goorin Bros. before a day at Central Park, or any day, for that matter. goorin.com - 337 Bleecker St...